pricing

  • The truth about pricing, peer pressure and parenthood

    This originally went out in my newsletter this week, but I had so many lovely messages from subscribers who felt relieved that they weren’t alone when it comes to freelancing peer pressure and perfection, that I thought it was worth a share here too. 

    I’ve been feeling the peer pressure recently.

    Every time I log onto Facebook, I’m (super-enthusiastically) told:

    • You’re just one Facebook ad away from a six figure business (just as long as you’re OK with paying five figures in FB ads to launch that six figure launch)
    • Make SEVEN figures from your online course! Here’s a 15 step plan to do it! Only £4k.
    • Raise your prices! Constantly! Even if it makes you really, really uncomfortable.
    • You can have a baby, have a million dollar business and have a pristine house and office. To not do so is terribly un-feminist. Pushing yourself to a breakdown is so 2016, darling.
    • Everything I’m doing is wrong and everyone else is right, and get with the programme Emma (OK, that one might just be that mean little voice in my head)

    How utterly exhausting.

    Honestly? I don’t give a damn about having a six figure business right now. If that’s your goal, more power to you! I have nothing against having a chunky bank balance, but right now my goals have to be life-based. I mean, I want to be able to pay the bills, treat myself and my little family and have a semi-comfortable life. But the reason I love being freelance is the flexibility it gives me, the ability to be able to work with people I actually like, and to work from home. I’ve been so focused on ‘proving myself’ financially (partly from guilt that I’m not setting a good example here as a freelancer), that I got a big lost along the way. Which actually limited my income.

    I’m also tired of cookie cutter sales language. Big claims without the evidence. I feel like I’m back at school, with the popular girls boasting about how many boys they’ve pulled and the rest of us feeling a bit inadequate in comparison. Except, now they’re charging thousands to teach you how to replicate their success. In general, I’m just a bit tired of the overwhelm and the enthusiastic quick fixes to a big business. My introvert brain needs a break from all that noise!

    So, I’m making some changes.

    • I’ve lowered my coaching prices. It’s not really the done thing to lower your prices, but I want to help more freelancers (new and established), and lowering my prices makes coaching more accessible. I really believe coaching can make a big difference, and it’s had a huge impact on my life. In fact, as hard on myself as I can be, I think without it I’d have caved in and thrown in the towel by now, instead of relaunching my business and growing it.
    • I’m going to get over this peer pressure block that’s stopped me blogging and podcasting until I’m ‘perfect’. I’ve actually achieved quite a bit over the last year, something I want to blog about more.
    • Here’s a controversial one – accept that it’s ok for the next couple of years to not be where my business was pre-baby. I have a third of the time I had before to work (and that’s throwing working nap times into the mix). It’s ok not to have a baby and a bazillion pounds in the bank, as long as you’re achieving what you want to (for me, that’s time with my son while affording to pay the bills and helping more people to go freelance or improve their freelance life). On that note…
    • *deep breath* Share an income report. This one is risky and very scary, because I don’t have a six figure income (or anywhere close). But there are two benefits: a) it shows you what I actually earn, so I don’t feed into the number bending bullsh*t b) it keeps me accountable with some goal setting for the following month. Because I do want to increase my income, but not by adding to the bullsh*t.

    What does success mean to you? I’d love to hear your personal definition of success in the comments.

  • How to set your prices as a freelancer

    how to set your prices

    This week, it’s all about the money. The benjamins. The moolah. The dough. Y’know, the stuff that helps us pay our bills (and pay for shoes).

    I got myself into a bit of a tizz recently, as I was doing a lot of work, but the payoff didn’t really equal it. After a chat with the wise and wonderful JJ from This Little Lady Went To London, I had a look at what I was charging for my work. While my daily rate is about right, my packages were quite a bit cheaper than the competition. So, I’ve raised them! It’s a bit of a scary thing to do, but hopefully my current prices now reflect the time and skill I put into my work.

    So! My challenge this week for you is to do the same. Are you charging the same prices you were when you first started? It’s very common for newbies to charge very little or nothing at all at the start before they gain some confidence. Or perhaps you’re concerned that charging higher rates will cut your customer base. That’s true, but wouldn’t you rather provide a high quality service at justifiable prices?

    Here are a few things to do to decide on your prices (and don’t be afraid to reassess your prices every six months!)

    • Have a watch of this Marie Forleo video for a guide on how to set your prices:

    • Next, check out the London Freelance Fees Guide, which covers lots of freelancing roles and the average price for them.
    • There’s also a great guide on Creative Pool that I’ve mentioned before that has some handy up-to-date prices.
    • There are also some methods for working out your prices in this Lifehacker piece.
    • Lucky Bitch (affil) has a great set of free tips on how to charge premium prices
    • Get researching. Have a look on the websites of those who offer similar services. Many, like mine, list their prices. How do they compare?
    • Finally, ask your friends and family – ideally those in the industry. I’m fortunate to be surrounded by people who will give me an honest opinion.
    That’s your challenge for this week. Have a go, then let me know how you get on…