There are certain books that always sit on my desk. Some are very work-based, while others are for inspiration (or just for picking what I’m going to do for lunch). Sometimes I just prefer to read an actual book with pages rather than scroll, scroll, scroll (although I do have a rising collection of ebooks – but that’s another blog post)

Starting from the bottom:

Blogging for Dummies

C’mon, we all have a ‘…for Dummies’ book tucked away somewhere don’t we? This is great for checking a few things or brushing up on blogging skills. Also, it makes a great laptop stand…

BUST DIY Guide to life

A recent addition, but one I’ve had my eye on for ages. It’s got DIY guides for pretty much everything – from putting up shelves to sorting your finances. As I write for a number of different clients, it’s handy having a general guide to hand if I need some inspiration.

Domestic Sluttery

Regular readers will know I’m a big fan of the blog Domestic Sluttery. It’s ‘The home and lifestyle blog for women who have better things to do’, and the book follows the same theme. I tend to dip into this for recipes and general advice (there are some great cheat sheets in the back for size conversions and washing instructions, which is handy for when I write about fashion).

My Grammar and I (or should that be ‘Me’?) 

This is my go-to grammar book, and I’ve got a dozen post it notes poking out the top for bits that I regularly come back to. Very readable too, considering the topic.

Eats, Shoots & Leaves

I occasionally flick through Eats, Shoots & Leaves for grammar advice too, as it seems to be the industry standard for anyone that writes for a living.

The Wonderful Weekend Book

LOVE this book. I tend to dive into it for inspiration when I have a rare day off and want to do something (I have an inability to laze around since going freelance, feels like a waste of time). It’s all about reclaiming your weekends and doing something interesting, rather than spending hours in the supermarket or watching SATC reruns.

The Thrift Book

Freelancing is a feast or famine business. So for times when money is a bit tight, I turn to India Knight’s The Thrift Book. India outlines everything from how to make your own cheese to what make up you must splurge on. I’ve folded the corners of half the pages. This is why I’m not allowed to rent from the library anymore.

Thesaurus

Well, there’s only so many times you can call a bag gorgeous, cute or pretty before you lose the will to live.

What books do you always keep on your desk? 

5 comments on “My favourite freelancing reads”

  1. I’ve been told ‘Rework’ by Jason Fried & David Heinemeier Hansson will change my life so it arrived this morning ready for me to read over a lunch break!

  2. Thank you so much for sharing this. I have ‘My Grammar and I’ and it’s really useful to me as a speaker of English as a Second Language. ‘Bust DIY’ and ‘The Thrift Book’ are very very tempting.
    Currently, I have been preparing myself to enter the kingdom of freelancing with the excellent ‘How to Succeed as a Freelancer in Publishing’ by Emma Murray and Charlie Wilson, ‘Freelance Proofreading and Copy-editing’ by Trevor Horwood, and just rented from the library ‘Copyediting: a practical guide’ by Karen Judd. The last one is so so good, I’m using some of those bookmark post-its so I don’t fold the corners and they don’t ban me from the library. 😉 Oh, and speaking of libraries: do not bother buying the Writer and Artist’s Guide nor the Writer’s Handbook, as most libraries have them and renew them every year. Now I’m stuck with my 2009 copy of the Handbook, which is now only useful as a doormat.

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